Highlighting unfair labor practices under the NLRA

| Sep 8, 2020 | Employee Law

Federal labor law in the United States has long enabled federal workers to join and form unions. The right to do so is obviously critically important and has led to workplace gains over decades that have fostered on-the-job fairness and broad-based equity.

Labor unions are properly concerned with a wide spectrum of matters and frequently require proven legal representation across an encompassing sphere of concerns. Those range across areas like these:

  • Alleged breach of contract
  • Union organization
  • Grievance arbitration
  • Contract negotiations
  • Proceedings before key labor organs like the EEOC and MSPB
  • Unfair labor practices

Today we spotlight that last bullet entry. Alleged unfair labor practices can find unions on either side of a dispute; employers are sometimes accused of unlawful conduct against union rights and activities, and unions themselves are occasionally accused of coercive or restraining conduct by both employers and employees.

Examples of the former are many and varied. Unions sometimes file charges with the National Labor Relations Board alleging employer misconduct ranging from attempts to hinder union organization to interference with employees’ collective bargaining rights. Companies sometimes discriminate against workers for their union participation and seek to dominate or illegally support a union.

And examples of alleged unfair labor practices against unions are also myriad and wide-ranging. Unions are accused of conducting strikes, boycotts and related actions for unlawful purposes. Charges might highlight efforts to coerce workers who don’t support union activities. Some unions must defend against prohibitively high membership fees, refusal to bargain in good faith with an employer and other claimed acts of misbehavior.

The federal unfair labor practices realm is vast and complex. Questions or concerns can be directed to a proven employment law attorney team.

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