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OWCP - Federal Workers' Compensation Archives

Dog bite prevention week never gets old

It is that time of year again. Winter has passed and the improving weather that follows means more people and their pets are outside taking advantage of the weather. This is probably bigger news for people in the northern tier states than those in the south, but it's something about which the whole country takes note.

Fate of federal programs to improve worker safety in question

Regular readers of our blog will recall that we have written about the trials and tribulations of those in the nursing community. In one post not too long ago, we took note of how news reports about the high rate of occupational injury among nurses had prompted the Occupational Safety and Health Administration to launch a nationwide inspection of hospital facilities, including those within the Department of Veterans Affairs

What are possible steps to appeal an OWCP final determination?

Claim denied. A worker does not want to see those words after being hurt on the job. Workers' compensation programs in all states are supposed to be there on a no-fault basis – founded on the principle that injuries happen. When they do, a worker should be given the care necessary to achieve the fullest possible recovery.

What's a consequential injury?

Workers' compensation is not meant to be difficult. The premise is simple. A worker, government or private, hurt on the job, is entitled to the medical treatment and time needed to make as full a recovery as possible. You would think that denials would be few and far between, but they are common.

Can I refuse a limited duty work offer after a job injury?

Workers' compensation benefits are a right to which everyone is entitled. Federal workers are no exception, even if the vehicles for delivering those benefits vary from what are available for private sector employees.

What do I need to know if I get hurt in my federal job?

Accidents can happen anytime, anywhere. That's sort of the nature of accidents. However, if you are a worker, and specifically a federal worker in Texas or anywhere federal employees are employed, risk of injury has a way of increasing.

Feds propose changes to OWCP benefits for maritime work injuries

Considering the size of the federal government, it's fair to ask whether there is any such thing as a small agency or division. It's a rhetorical question. As we noted in our last post on this federal employees' law blog, there is a broad array of programs covering different segments of the government workforce just to deal with compensation when injuries or illness on the job occur.

Are you clear on what you're entitled to under OWCP law?

No one likes to be pigeonholed. This may be particularly true of residents of Texas. Being stuck in a category may leave you feeling stripped of your individuality or reduced to a number. Unfortunately, when it comes to working for an organization as complicated as the federal government, some regimentation becomes necessary.

IRS workplace safety issues cited in new IG report

The headline reads, "Hundreds of IRS Workers Injured on the Job Every Year." If your first reaction is to snicker and say, "They must suffer lots of paper cuts," you'd be well off the mark. The fact of the matter, according to a new report by the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration, is that IRS workers across the country, including Texas, report in excess of 800 new injuries every year and most of them are due to slips, trips and falls.

Maintaining OWCP benefits for as long as needed, Part 2

Workers' compensation is supposed to be that no-fault safety net that helps workers get the treatment and therapy needed to recover and return to work. As we noted in our previous post, the benefit system for federal workers in Texas and across the country is separate from those for the private sector.

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